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Displaying 12 of 12 results for "NMT2"
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  1. Human N-myristoyltransferase isoform 2 (NMT2) PDB

    ID: PDB:4C2X

    Description: GLYCYLPEPTIDE N-TETRADECANOYLTRANSFERASE 2 (E.C.2.3.1.97)

  2. NMT2_MOUSE UniProt:Swiss-Prot

    ID: O70311

    Description: Glycylpeptide N-tetradecanoyltransferase 2 Myristoyl-CoA binding Myristoyl-CoA binding Myristoyl-CoA binding Poly-Lys Phosphoserine

    gene.name: Nmt2
  3. NMT2_BOVIN UniProt:Swiss-Prot

    ID: Q9N181

    Description: Glycylpeptide N-tetradecanoyltransferase 2 Myristoyl-CoA binding Myristoyl-CoA binding Myristoyl-CoA binding Poly-Lys Phosphoserine

    gene.name: NMT2
  4. Expression of microRNAs and their gene targets are dysregulated in pre-invasive breast cancer (mRNA) ArrayExpress

    ID: E-GEOD-24506

    Description: X7 (which regulates E-cadherin expression), DOK4, NMT2, and EGR1. Augmentation of CBX7 by knockdown of miR-182 expression, in turn, positively regulated the expression of E-cadherin, a key protein involved in maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology which is commonly lost during neoplastic progression. Conclusions: These data provide the first miRNA expression profile of normal breast epithelium and of pre-invasive breast carcinoma. Further, we demonstrate that altered miRNA expression can modulate gene expression changes that characterize these early cancers. We conclude that miRNA dysregulation likely plays a substantial role in early breast cancer development. Two total samples were analyzed via Affymetrix U133A. Case numbers correspond to individual patients. Each sample is identified by case number, histologic lesion and corresponding microarray ID....

  5. Expression of microRNAs and their gene targets are dysregulated in pre-invasive breast cancer (microRNA) ArrayExpress

    ID: E-GEOD-24508

    Description: X7 (which regulates E-cadherin expression), DOK4, NMT2, and EGR1. Augmentation of CBX7 by knockdown of miR-182 expression, in turn, positively regulated the expression of E-cadherin, a key protein involved in maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology which is commonly lost during neoplastic progression. Conclusions: These data provide the first miRNA expression profile of normal breast epithelium and of pre-invasive breast carcinoma. Further, we demonstrate that altered miRNA expression can modulate gene expression changes that characterize these early cancers. We conclude that miRNA dysregulation likely plays a substantial role in early breast cancer development. The expression of 365 microRNAs were measured in 19 total samples via multiplex reverse transcription PCR using the TaqMan Human MicroRNA Low Density Array. Patients age ranged from 42-75. Equal amounts of total RNA from 9 reduction mammoplasty samples (age range 42-75) were combined into a pooled RM control (PRM), this sample was run in triplicate. Remaining 16 samples consist of matched samples of ductal carcinoma in situ and adjacent histologically normal breast epithelium, these are identified by case number and histologic lesion....

  6. Expression of microRNAs and their gene targets are dysregulated in pre-invasive breast cancer (mRNA) BioProject

    ID: PRJNA133519

    Keywords: Transcriptome or Gene expression

    Access Type: download

    dataset.description: X7 (which regulates E-cadherin expression), DOK4, NMT2, and EGR1. Augmentation of CBX7 by knockdown of miR-182 expression, in turn, positively regulated the expression of E-cadherin, a key protein involved in maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology which is commonly lost during neoplastic progression. Conclusions: These data provide the first miRNA expression profile of normal breast epithelium and of pre-invasive breast carcinoma. Further, we demonstrate that altered miRNA expression can modulate gene expression changes that characterize these early cancers. We conclude that miRNA dysregulation likely plays a substantial role in early breast cancer development. Overall design: Two total samples were analyzed via Affymetrix U133A. Case numbers correspond to individual patients. Each sample is identified by case number, histologic lesion and corresponding microarray ID....
  7. Expression of microRNAs and their gene targets are dysregulated in pre-invasive breast cancer (microRNA) BioProject

    ID: PRJNA133521

    Keywords: Other

    Access Type: download

    dataset.description: X7 (which regulates E-cadherin expression), DOK4, NMT2, and EGR1. Augmentation of CBX7 by knockdown of miR-182 expression, in turn, positively regulated the expression of E-cadherin, a key protein involved in maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology which is commonly lost during neoplastic progression. Conclusions: These data provide the first miRNA expression profile of normal breast epithelium and of pre-invasive breast carcinoma. Further, we demonstrate that altered miRNA expression can modulate gene expression changes that characterize these early cancers. We conclude that miRNA dysregulation likely plays a substantial role in early breast cancer development. Overall design: The expression of 365 microRNAs were measured in 19 total samples via multiplex reverse transcription PCR using the TaqMan Human MicroRNA Low Density Array. Patients age ranged from 42-75. Equal amounts of total RNA from 9 reduction mammoplasty samples (age range 42-75) were combined into a pooled RM control (PRM), this sample was run in triplicate. Remaining 16 samples consist of matched samples of ductal carcinoma in situ and adjacent histologically normal breast epithelium, these are identified by case number and histologic lesion....
  8. Cohesin localisation along fission yeast chromosomes delineates conserved mechanisms of binding ArrayExpress

    ID: E-GEOD-13517

    Description: dium lacking thiamine, conditions under which the nmt2 gene is transcribed at the nmt2/avn2 convergent site that has been studied as an example. In contrast to the prediction, the cohesin pattern along chromosome arms, including the nmt2/avn2 convergent site, remained unchanged in swi6Δ cells (GSM333008). We detected only small amounts of cohesin at the nmt2/avn2 convergent site, a class 1 convergent site following the above classification. At the centromeric repeats, cohesin levels were reduced in the absence of Swi6. These findings are consistent with previous reports implicating Swi6 in cohesin recruitment to centromeric heterochromatin, but not chromosome arms. To compare cohesin’s pattern to its likely sites of chromosomal loading, we analysed the localisation of the cohesin loader subunits Mis4 and Ssl3. The two subunits showed a largely overlapping pattern of binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed against epitope-tagged Mis4-Pk9 (GSM333163) and Ssl3-Pk9 (GSM334196) from exponentially proliferating cells. As a control, cells without epitope-tagged protein were grown under identical conditions and processed in parallel for chromatin immunoprecipitation with an α-Pk antibody (GSM333230). The untagged control sample yielded trace amounts of immunoprecipitated DNA, which after amplification led to several strong peaks often in intergenic low complexity regions. Several of these peaks overlapped with Mis4/Ssl3 peaks, which were excluded from the analysis. Peaks in low complexity regions were not observed in chromatin immunoprecipitates of cohesin subunits (compare GSM333001). In the search for an underlying determinant of Mis4/Ssl3 binding sites, we noticed a striking correlation with tRNA and ribosomal protein genes. Mis4/Ssl3 binding sites at tRNA genes overlapped with the binding profile of the Pol III transcription factor TFIIIC subunit Sfc6 (GSM334198), while at ribosomal protein genes it colocalised with the forkhead domain containing protein Fhl1 (GSM334307). Fhl1 is a possible fission yeast ortholog of the transcription factor Fhl1 that controls ribosomal protein gene expression in budding yeast. We found Sfc6 also associated with ribosomal protein genes, and Fhl1 with tRNA genes, though with weaker signal intensities. We do not currently know whether Sfc6 contributes to transcriptional control of ribosomal protein genes, and Fhl1 to that of tRNA genes, or whether the weaker levels of association may reflect indirect association, mediated by interactions between ribosomal protein and tRNA gene loci. Similar to budding yeast, Mis4/Ssl3 binding sites are also binding sites for the chromosomal condensin complex (GSM334197), which may mediate such interactions. Having identified the binding sites of the Mis4/Ssl3 cohesin loader, we wanted to analyse its relationship with the cohesin distribution along chromosome arms. If Mis4/Ssl3 cohesin loading sites promote cohesin binding in their surrounding, deletion of a loading site should alter this pattern. To test this, we deleted a 489 bp sequence, containing two adjacent tRNA genes that form a Mis4/Ssl3 and cohesin binding site, on the left arm of chromosome 2. In response to the deletion, Mis4/Ssl3 binding to this locus disappeared (GSM334308). Cohesin was also no longer detected at this site (GSM334309), consistent with the notion that cohesin loading had been disrupted. However, the cohesin distribution at convergent sites surrounding the former loading site remained unchanged. This suggests that establishment of the cohesin pattern did not depend on a specific ...

  9. Cohesin localisation along fission yeast chromosomes delineates conserved mechanisms of binding OmicsDI

    ID: E-GEOD-13517

    Date Released: 05-01-2014

    Description: dium lacking thiamine, conditions under which the nmt2 gene is transcribed at the nmt2/avn2 convergent site that has been studied as an example. In contrast to the prediction, the cohesin pattern along chromosome arms, including the nmt2/avn2 convergent site, remained unchanged in swi6Δ cells (GSM333008). We detected only small amounts of cohesin at the nmt2/avn2 convergent site, a class 1 convergent site following the above classification. At the centromeric repeats, cohesin levels were reduced in the absence of Swi6. These findings are consistent with previous reports implicating Swi6 in cohesin recruitment to centromeric heterochromatin, but not chromosome arms. To compare cohesin’s pattern to its likely sites of chromosomal loading, we analysed the localisation of the cohesin loader subunits Mis4 and Ssl3. The two subunits showed a largely overlapping pattern of binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed against epitope-tagged Mis4-Pk9 (GSM333163) and Ssl3-Pk9 (GSM334196) from exponentially proliferating cells. As a control, cells without epitope-tagged protein were grown under identical conditions and processed in parallel for chromatin immunoprecipitation with an α-Pk antibody (GSM333230). The untagged control sample yielded trace amounts of immunoprecipitated DNA, which after amplification led to several strong peaks often in intergenic low complexity regions. Several of these peaks overlapped with Mis4/Ssl3 peaks, which were excluded from the analysis. Peaks in low complexity regions were not observed in chromatin immunoprecipitates of cohesin subunits (compare GSM333001). In the search for an underlying determinant of Mis4/Ssl3 binding sites, we noticed a striking correlation with tRNA and ribosomal protein genes. Mis4/Ssl3 binding sites at tRNA genes overlapped with the binding profile of the Pol III transcription factor TFIIIC subunit Sfc6 (GSM334198), while at ribosomal protein genes it colocalised with the forkhead domain containing protein Fhl1 (GSM334307). Fhl1 is a possible fission yeast ortholog of the transcription factor Fhl1 that controls ribosomal protein gene expression in budding yeast. We found Sfc6 also associated with ribosomal protein genes, and Fhl1 with tRNA genes, though with weaker signal intensities. We do not currently know whether Sfc6 contributes to transcriptional control of ribosomal protein genes, and Fhl1 to that of tRNA genes, or whether the weaker levels of association may reflect indirect association, mediated by interactions between ribosomal protein and tRNA gene loci. Similar to budding yeast, Mis4/Ssl3 binding sites are also binding sites for the chromosomal condensin complex (GSM334197), which may mediate such interactions. Having identified the binding sites of the Mis4/Ssl3 cohesin loader, we wanted to analyse its relationship with the cohesin distribution along chromosome arms. If Mis4/Ssl3 cohesin loading sites promote cohesin binding in their surrounding, deletion of a loading site should alter this pattern. To test this, we deleted a 489 bp sequence, containing two adjacent tRNA genes that form a Mis4/Ssl3 and cohesin binding site, on the left arm of chromosome 2. In response to the deletion, Mis4/Ssl3 binding to this locus disappeared (GSM334308). Cohesin was also no longer detected at this site (GSM334309), consistent with the notion that cohesin loading had been disrupted. However, the cohesin distribution at convergent sites surrounding the former loading site remained unchanged. This suggests that establishment of the cohesin pattern did not depend on a specific ...

  10. Cohesin localisation along fission yeast chromosomes delineates conserved mechanisms of binding BioProject

    ID: PRJNA110125

    Keywords: Epigenomics

    Access Type: download

    dataset.description: dium lacking thiamine, conditions under which the nmt2 gene is transcribed at the nmt2/avn2 convergent site that has been studied as an example. In contrast to the prediction, the cohesin pattern along chromosome arms, including the nmt2/avn2 convergent site, remained unchanged in swi6Δ cells (GSM333008). We detected only small amounts of cohesin at the nmt2/avn2 convergent site, a class 1 convergent site following the above classification. At the centromeric repeats, cohesin levels were reduced in the absence of Swi6. These findings are consistent with previous reports implicating Swi6 in cohesin recruitment to centromeric heterochromatin, but not chromosome arms. To compare cohesin’s pattern to its likely sites of chromosomal loading, we analysed the localisation of the cohesin loader subunits Mis4 and Ssl3. The two subunits showed a largely overlapping pattern of binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed against epitope-tagged Mis4-Pk9 (GSM333163) and Ssl3-Pk9 (GSM334196) from exponentially proliferating cells. As a control, cells without epitope-tagged protein were grown under identical conditions and processed in parallel for chromatin immunoprecipitation with an α-Pk antibody (GSM333230). The untagged control sample yielded trace amounts of immunoprecipitated DNA, which after amplification led to several strong peaks often in intergenic low complexity regions. Several of these peaks overlapped with Mis4/Ssl3 peaks, which were excluded from the analysis. Peaks in low complexity regions were not observed in chromatin immunoprecipitates of cohesin subunits (compare GSM333001). In the search for an underlying determinant of Mis4/Ssl3 binding sites, we noticed a striking correlation with tRNA and ribosomal protein genes. Mis4/Ssl3 binding sites at tRNA genes overlapped with the binding profile of the Pol III transcription factor TFIIIC subunit Sfc6 (GSM334198), while at ribosomal protein genes it colocalised with the forkhead domain containing protein Fhl1 (GSM334307). Fhl1 is a possible fission yeast ortholog of the transcription factor Fhl1 that controls ribosomal protein gene expression in budding yeast. We found Sfc6 also associated with ribosomal protein genes, and Fhl1 with tRNA genes, though with weaker signal intensities. We do not currently know whether Sfc6 contributes to transcriptional control of ribosomal protein genes, and Fhl1 to that of tRNA genes, or whether the weaker levels of association may reflect indirect association, mediated by interactions between ribosomal protein and tRNA gene loci. Similar to budding yeast, Mis4/Ssl3 binding sites are also binding sites for the chromosomal condensin complex (GSM334197), which may mediate such interactions. Having identified the binding sites of the Mis4/Ssl3 cohesin loader, we wanted to analyse its relationship with the cohesin distribution along chromosome arms. If Mis4/Ssl3 cohesin loading sites promote cohesin binding in their surrounding, deletion of a loading site should alter this pattern. To test this, we deleted a 489 bp sequence, containing two adjacent tRNA genes that form a Mis4/Ssl3 and cohesin binding site, on the left arm of chromosome 2. In response to the deletion, Mis4/Ssl3 binding to this locus disappeared (GSM334308). Cohesin was also no longer detected at this site (GSM334309), consistent with the notion that cohesin loading had been disrupted. However, the cohesin distribution at convergent sites surrounding the former loading site remained unchanged. This suggests that establishment of the cohesin pattern did not depend on a specific Mis4/Ssl3 bindin...
  11. Expression of microRNAs and their gene targets are dysregulated in pre-invasive breast cancer (microRNA) OmicsDI

    ID: E-GEOD-24508

    Date Released: 04-18-2012

    Description: X7 (which regulates E-cadherin expression), DOK4, NMT2, and EGR1. Augmentation of CBX7 by knockdown of miR-182 expression, in turn, positively regulated the expression of E-cadherin, a key protein involved in maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology which is commonly lost during neoplastic progression. Conclusions: These data provide the first miRNA expression profile of normal breast epithelium and of pre-invasive breast carcinoma. Further, we demonstrate that altered miRNA expression can modulate gene expression changes that characterize these early cancers. We conclude that miRNA dysregulation likely plays a substantial role in early breast cancer development. The expression of 365 microRNAs were measured in 19 total samples via multiplex reverse transcription PCR using the TaqMan Human MicroRNA Low Density Array. Patients age ranged from 42-75. Equal amounts of total RNA from 9 reduction mammoplasty samples (age range 42-75) were combined into a pooled RM control (PRM), this sample was run in triplicate. Remaining 16 samples consist of matched samples of ductal carcinoma in situ and adjacent histologically normal breast epithelium, these are identified by case number and histologic lesion....

  12. Expression of microRNAs and their gene targets are dysregulated in pre-invasive breast cancer (mRNA) OmicsDI

    ID: E-GEOD-24506

    Date Released: 04-18-2012

    Description: X7 (which regulates E-cadherin expression), DOK4, NMT2, and EGR1. Augmentation of CBX7 by knockdown of miR-182 expression, in turn, positively regulated the expression of E-cadherin, a key protein involved in maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology which is commonly lost during neoplastic progression. Conclusions: These data provide the first miRNA expression profile of normal breast epithelium and of pre-invasive breast carcinoma. Further, we demonstrate that altered miRNA expression can modulate gene expression changes that characterize these early cancers. We conclude that miRNA dysregulation likely plays a substantial role in early breast cancer development. Two total samples were analyzed via Affymetrix U133A. Case numbers correspond to individual patients. Each sample is identified by case number, histologic lesion and corresponding microarray ID....


Displaying 12 of 12 results for "NMT2"