Mountain View
biomedical and healthCAre Data Discovery Index Ecosystem
help Advanced Search
Title: Couples and Well-Being Project, 1993-1995, Detroit Metropolitan Area      
dateReleased:
04-08-2015
downloadURL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22081.v1
ID:
doi:10.3886/ICPSR22081.v1
description:
The primary aims of this research program were to explore the effects that thinking and talking about relationships under various conditions have on the relationship and to examine the underlying factors that determine whether the effects are positive or negative. Satisfying personal relationships contribute to an individual's psychological and physical health. By thinking about what their relationship is like and talking to each other about it, partners can often strengthen their relationship and contribute to their well-being. The sample is composed of 90 unmarried couples and 148 married couples. Wave 1 is 238 couples (476 individuals) interviewed in 1993. Wave 2 consists of 70 percent of the original sample 2 years later (1995). The average length of time in the relationship is approximately 10 years for all couples (3.3 years for unmarried couples and 13.9 years for married couples). Studies have been conducted to more fully understand the concept of relationship awareness and to identify the conditions that moderate the influence of relationship awareness on the partners in the relationship. Investigations have also focused on relationship talk as a way to maintain and enhance the relationship, and how social support in close relationships is associated with depression, anxiety, and relationship satisfaction. Gender differences are found not only in the means of relationship awareness variables, but also in the associations of such variables with relationship outcomes. Another goal of this program was to examine the contextual factors, correlates and consequences of relational talk by observing partners as they interact with each other. By examining partners' tendencies to think and talk about relationships, this research program aimed to uncover the everyday workings of healthy relationships rather than focus on partners in conflict. In so doing, these studies may uncover ways to help couples prevent unnecessary distress not by avoiding the conflicts that are sometimes inevitable, but by articulating the ways that people can negotiate their relationships with one another. Respondents were asked self-descriptive questions, such as how they find themselves as mature, friendly, and hardworking. Other questions focus on respondents' feelings about their relationship with their spouse/partner and with others.
description:
Acitelli, Linda K.; Veroff, Joseph; Douvan, Elizabeth, 2015, "Couples and Well-Being Project, 1993-1995, Detroit Metropolitan Area", http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22081.v1
name:
Acitelli, Linda K.
Veroff, Joseph
Douvan, Elizabeth
homePage: http://www.harvard.edu/
name:
Harvard University
ID:
SCR:011273
abbreviation:
DataVerse
homePage: http://thedata.org/
name:
Dataverse Network Project
ID:
SCR:001997