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Title: Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS) 2: Organizational Process Improvement Intervention (OPII), 2010-2013 [United States]      
dateReleased:
04-09-2015
downloadURL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35082.v1
ID:
doi:10.3886/ICPSR35082.v1
description:
The Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies 2 (CJ-DATS 2) was launched in 2008 with a focus on conducting implementation research in criminal justice settings. Specifically, NIDA charged the cooperative with testing implementation strategies that could result in sustained uptake and delivery of services in three domains: (1) delivery of medication-assisted treatment for offenders transitioning to the community; (2) delivery of an HIV continuum of care (i.e., screening and counseling, risk reduction interventions, and continuity of antiretroviral treatment from prison or jail into the community); and (3) implementation of screening and assessment processes to identify offenders with drug abuse and related health problems and to inform their treatment planning and re-entry process. In each domain, grantees were to focus on or ganizational and system-level implementation strategies, and to engage both community corrections and community-based treatment providers in a process that would leverage key facilitators, address barriers, and jointly address the public safety concerns of criminal justice agencies with the public health goals of NIDA and the community-based treatment partners. NIDA's ultimate goal for CJ-DATS 2 is to identify implementation strategies that maximize the likelihood of sustained delivery of evidence-based practices to improve offender drug abuse and HIV outcomes, and to decrease their risk of incarceration. Organizational Process Improvement Intervention (OPII) The OPII study (aka Assessment study) focuses on implementing assessment and treatment planning processes. Screening and assessment are used to identify substance abuse-related problems and to develop programming to address the problems so identified. Conducting a valid and reliable assessment is considered an essential step in providing effective treatment services and in being able to prioritize treatment and services according to type and severity of need. While research has established that a number of screening and assessment instruments (e.g., ASI, GAIN, LSI-R) have adequate validity and reliability, there is far less research on the successful implementation of these assessment tools, or on how they should be used to improve the course and effectiveness of treatment. The OPII study uses a modified NIATx approach. The OPII study engages corrections and treatment agencies to improve the quality of interagency communication through the effective use of assessment and case planning processes and treatment referrals. Both inter-agency and intra-agency change processes are targeted. A multi-phase implementation protocol is used, wherein agencies engage in team development, needs assessment, planning, implementation, and sustainability in distinct steps. Each site's change team has a designated facilitator, and their activities are coordinated across sites through the use of a facilitator manual and ongoing fidelity measurement. Early- and delayed-start sites allow the research team to control for effects of environmental changes within states. The key outcomes for this protocol reflect improvements in the use of assessment and case planning procedures for offenders. Specifically, offenders should not only receive comprehensive assessments, but the results of these assessments should inform case plans, and the information in the case plan should be conveyed to the local treatment provider agency to which the offender is referred upon release. The protocol targets critical communications channels between otherwise often highly segregated correctional and treatment agencies. Evaluation of the OPII used a multi-site cluster randomized design with multiple measures over the course of the intervention. Clusters consisted of a criminal justice agency and one or more community treatment providers that received referrals from that criminal justice agency. Each Center had two clusters (one had three), and each cluster was randomized design with multiple measures over the course of the intervention. Clusters consisted of a criminal justice agency and one or more community treatment providers that received referrals from that criminal justice agency. Each Center had two clusters (one had three), and each cluster was randomized to an Early-Start or a Delayed-Start condition. After randomization, the Early-Start sites began the OPII, while the Delayed-Start sites conducted business as usual, without any additional intervention. After approximately 12 months, or when the Early-Start change team completed the Implementation phase, the Delayed-Start change team began to carry out the protocol.
description:
Prendergast, Michael; Shafer, Michael; Frisman, Linda; Visher, Christy; Leukefeld, Carl; Sacks, Stanley; Friedmann, Peter; Stein, Lyn; Knight, Kevin; Belenko, Steven, 2015, "Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS) 2: Organizational Process Improvement Intervention (OPII), 2010-2013 [United States]", http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35082.v1
name:
Prendergast, Michael
Shafer, Michael
Frisman, Linda
Visher, Christy
Leukefeld, Carl
Sacks, Stanley
Friedmann, Peter
Stein, Lyn
Knight, Kevin
Belenko, Steven
homePage: http://www.harvard.edu/
name:
Harvard University
ID:
SCR:011273
abbreviation:
DataVerse
homePage: http://thedata.org/
name:
Dataverse Network Project
ID:
SCR:001997