Mountain View
biomedical and healthCAre Data Discovery Index Ecosystem
help Advanced Search
Title: Preventing Depression in Couples Facing Job Loss, 1996-1998: [Baltimore, Maryland, and Detroit, Michigan]      
dateReleased:
04-08-2015
downloadURL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03567.v1
ID:
doi:10.3886/ICPSR03567.v1
description:
The Couples Employment Project (CEP), conducted during 1996 and 1998, was a randomized field study designed to test the effectiveness of an intervention for couples experiencing job loss. The intervention, an eight- workshop series consisting of job search strategy seminars and several sessions focusing specifically on the couple, was intended to prevent depression and deterioration in the quality of family life. This collaborative project was conducted in the Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area and the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area. During the study period 6,534 couples (job seekers and their spouses/partners) were screened and recruited to the study. One thousand four hundred eighty-seven participants completed a baseline (T1) assessment. Couples who completed the T1 interview were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 1,070) and control conditions (n = 417). In the experimental condition, couples were offered the chance to participate in the intervention workshop for couples. In the control condition, couples were given no information about the workshop. Within the experimental group, couples were further randomized into two different subgroups. In the first group, interviewers simply described the workshop and provided written materials about it. In the second group, interviewers also provided a 15-minute videotape about the workshop. This random assignment to recruitment condition (presence or absence of recruitment videotape) was used to test the effectiveness of the video in increasing workshop recruitment rates. Because the study design utilized an "intent-to-treat" strategy, researchers sought to collect follow-up data from all study respondents at post-test (time 2 [T2]), six months (time 3 [T3]), and one-year (time 4 [T4]). In addition to obtaining questionnaire measures on behavior, researchers were also interested in using direct observation of behavior to study the effects of the intervention. To this end, an extra wave of data was collected from a sub-sample of respondents between T2 and T3. This wave was referred to as time 2.5 (T2.5). This data collection is comprised of 6 parts. Part 1 is the data for those individuals who completed a screening questionnaire (given at T0), from which the final sample was derived. Each record in Part 1 represents the job seeker. Variables include the job seeker's gender, ethnicity, marital history, number of children in the household, number of weeks unemployed, and the job seeker's and partner's Kessler depression screening score. Parts 2 through 5 (where each record represents the couple) contain data collected during waves T1-T4. While the data presented in Parts 2-5 are by and large similar, it is the organization of these data that makes each part distinct. The data for Part 2 is organized to correspond exactly to the questionnaire items taken from the multitude of survey instruments used throughout the four waves. The variables in Part 3 contain mean scale measures computed using the questionnaire items from Part 2. The variables in this part are arranged by time period. Part 4, known as the Diamond file, is comprised of a subset of the more frequently used variables collected and/or computed in Parts 2 and 3. These variables are arranged by measure. Part 5, also organized by measure, contains the total mean scales along with two sets of sub-indices, which can be useful in structural equation modeling. Demographic variables included are age, sex, education, marital status, race/ethnicity, household income, and number of dependents. The various survey instruments focused on past employment history, re-employment and quality of new job, motivation to seek re-employment, job seeking efficacy, job seeking behaviors and effort, meaning of work (i.e., valence of work), financial measures, mental health outcomes, relationship outcomes, and the partner's expectation of the job seeker. Data for Part 6 is comprised of the survey and observational data collected from the sub-sample of respondents between waves T2 and T3. Variables include a series of questions geared toward the kinds of changes the job seeker and partner wished to see in each other, questions geared toward assessing the skills and knowledge the participants had about job seeking activities, and questions on how the couple handled the stress of a job search. Interviewers' observations of the respondents during various phases of the survey process are also included. Using the System for Coding Interactions in Dyads (SCID), interviewers were able to observe and measure the dimensions of behavior during a couple's problem solving discussions. The behaviors measured were verbal aggression, coerciveness, attempts to influence and control, negativity and conflict, withdrawal, sadness, communication, supportive listening, and positive affect. Both partners in the couple were rated individually on these codes.
description:
Price, Richard H.; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Howe, George W.; Caplan, Robert D., 2015, "Preventing Depression in Couples Facing Job Loss, 1996-1998: [Baltimore, Maryland, and Detroit, Michigan]", http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03567.v1
name:
Price, Richard H.
Vinokur, Amiram D.
Howe, George W.
Caplan, Robert D.
homePage: http://www.harvard.edu/
name:
Harvard University
ID:
SCR:011273
abbreviation:
DataVerse
homePage: http://thedata.org/
name:
Dataverse Network Project
ID:
SCR:001997