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Title: 1970 British Cohort Study: Twenty-Nine-Year Follow-up, 1999-2000      
dateReleased:
02-28-2012
downloadURL: http://hdl.handle.net/1902.5/5558
ID:
hdl:1902.5/5558
description:
Background The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began in 1970 when data were collected about the births and families of babies born in the United Kingdom in one particular week in 1970. The first wave, called the British Births Survey, was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to examine the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbid ity, and to compare the results with those of the National Child Development Study (NCDS), which commenced in 1958 (held separately at the UK Data Archive under GN 33004). Participants from Northern Ireland, who had been included in the birth survey, were dropped from the study in all subsequent sweeps, which only included respondents from Great Britain. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, educati on, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975 (held under SN 2699), aged 10, in 1980 (SN 3723), aged 16, in 1986 (SN 3535), aged 26, in 1996 (SN 3833), aged 30, 1999-2000 (SN 5558), and aged 34, in 2004-2005 (SN 5585). The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. A supplementary survey of head teachers (held separately under SN 5225) was also conducted at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Educatio n, University of London. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Response dataset: A separate dataset covering response to BCS70 over all seven waves is available under SN 5641, 1970 British Cohort Study Resp onse Dataset, 1970-2005. Users are advised to order this study alongside the other waves of BCS70. Sub-sample surveys In addition to the full cohort studies, four sub-sample surveys have been carried out. The first two, carried out in 1972 and 1973 and collectively named the British Births Child Survey, (held under SNs 2666 and 2690) followed sub-samples of the original cohort at ages 22 months and 42 months. The sub-samples consisted of all twins in the original c ohort, the 'small-for-dates' and 'post-mature' births, and a 10% random sample of the original cohort. The third sub-sample survey (not currently held at the Archive) was carried out in 1977 when 1,917 non-respondents from the five-year survey were traced and interviewed in an attempt to assess the effect of non-response. In 1992, when the cohort members were aged 21 years, a 10% sample survey (held under SN 4715) was carried out, that focused on adult literacy and numeracy problems as well as the transition from school to work. The CLS holds further information about the series on their British Cohort Study web pages, including details of publications and workshops. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held under SN 4126. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the 10- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Twenty-Nine-Year Follow-up, 1999-2000 was conducted when respondents were aged 29-30. Fieldwork was conducted alongside the sixth wave of the National Child Development Study (NCDS6). SN 5558 supersedes the former combined NCDS6/BCS70 1999-2000 dataset, which was held under SN 4396 National Child Development Study and 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) Follow-ups, 1999-2000. The Centre for Longitudinal Studies updated several BC S70 studies in late 2006, and as part of this work separated the composite NCDS6/BCS70 dataset. Improvements made include further data cleaning and the addition of new documentation. Users who have previously obtained SN 4396 should no longer use it, and should completely replace it with this one. The NCDS6 component of SN 4396 is now held separately under SN 5578 National Child Development Study: Sweep 6, 1999-2000. For the second edition (August 2008), the serial number has been replaced with a new one, variable Bcsid. This change has been made for all datasets in the BCS70 series. Further information may be found in the ‘CLS Confidentiality and Data Security Review’, included in the documentation. Main Topics Topics covered in the BCS70 cohort member interview for 1999-2000 covered: household: household members hips and interrelationships; ethnicity; languages spoken in the home housing: current address; intentions to move; homelessness; housing history relationships: marital status; relationship history children: pregnancy history; lone parenthood; infertility; adopted children; partner's children from a previous relationship; children over 16; family activities; demands of parenting family, social relationships and support: contact with family; emotional support family income, including sources of income other than work; financ ial situation employment: economic activity; current job; other paid work; unemployment; labour market histories; partner's job lifelong learning: qualifications; current course for qualification; assessment of current/most recent course; other courses and training; any lack of formal learning; contact with information technology; literacy and numeracy health: general health; long-term health conditions; respiratory problems; mental health; sight and hearing; other condit ions; accidents/injuries; hospital admissions; smoking; drinking; diet; exercise; height and weight citizenship and values: involvement with organisations; voting behaviour and intentions; political alignment; trade union membership; religion; newspaper readership; car ownership; values; political activity self-completion: opinions on key areas of life; quality of relationship with husband, wife or partner; work-related skills; psychological morbidity; experience of school exclusion and truancy; contact with the police and crime; use of illegal drugsStandard Mea sures: The attitude questions included in the instrumentation employ Likert-like scales. Other standard measures used include: Malaise Inventory: a measure of for assessing psychiatric morbidity, developed by Rutter and others at the Institute of Psychiatry from the Cornell Medical Index; Rutter, M., Tizard, J. and Whitemore K. (1970) Education, Health and Behaviour, London; and Rodgers, B. et al. (1999) 'Validity of the Malaise Inventory in general population samples', Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 34, pp.333-341 General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), a self-administered screening test, designed to identify short-term changes in mental health (depression, anxiety, social dysfunction and somatic symptoms) Locke-Wallace Marital Adjustment Test, a measure of marital distress/happiness (see Locke, H. J., and Wallace, K. M. (1959) 'Short marital adjustment and prediction tests: their reliability and val idity', Marriage and Family Living, 21, pp.251-255)
description:
University of London. Institute of Education. Centre for Longitudinal Studies, 2012, "1970 British Cohort Study: Twenty-Nine-Year Follow-up, 1999-2000"
name:
University of London. Institute of Education. Centre for Longitudinal Studies
homePage: http://www.harvard.edu/
name:
Harvard University
ID:
SCR:011273
abbreviation:
DataVerse
homePage: http://thedata.org/
name:
Dataverse Network Project
ID:
SCR:001997