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Title: World Values Surveys and European Values Surveys, 1981-1984, 1990-1993, and 1995-1997      
dateReleased:
02-28-2012
downloadURL: http://hdl.handle.net/1902.5/2790
ID:
hdl:1902.5/2790
description:
The series is designed to enable a crossnational comparison of values and norms on a wide variety of topics and to monitor changes in values and attitudes across the globe. This data collection consists of responses from WORLD VALUES SURVEY, 1981-1983 (ICPSR 9309) and WORLD VALUES SURVEY, 1981-1984 AND 1990-1993 (ICPSR 6160), along with data gathered during 1995-1997. Over 60 surveys representing more than 50 countries participated in the 1995-1997 study. The 1995 questionnaire retained those items that gave the most significant results from the 1981 and 1990 surveys. New topics pertaining to technology, social relationships, and parent-child relationships were added. Broad topics covered were work, personal finances, the economy, politics, allocation of resources, contemporary social issues, technology and its impact on society, and traditional values. Respondents were asked whether the following acts were ever justifiable: suicide, cheating on taxes, lying, euthanasia, divorce, and abortion. Respondents were also asked about the groups and associations they belonged to, which ones they worked for voluntarily, the groups they would not want as neighbors, their general state of health, and whether they felt they had free choice and control over their lives. A wide range of items was included on the meaning and purpose of life, such as respondents' views on the value of scientific advances, the demarcation of good and evil, and religious behavior and beliefs. Respondents were also queried about their attitudes toward religion, morality, politics, sexual freedom, marriage, single parenting, child-rearing, and the importance of work, family, politics, and religion in their lives. Questions relating to work included what financial and social benefits were most important to them in a job, the pride they took in their work, if they were happy with their current position, and their views on owner/state/employee management of business. Questions pertaining to the stability of the world economy, solutions for poverty, and whether respondents were happy with their financial situation were also asked. Respondents' opinions of various forms of political action, the most important aims for their countries, confidence in various civil and governmental institutions, and whether they would fight in a war for their country were also elicited. Demographic information includes family income, number of people residing in the home, size of locality, home ownership, region of residence, occupation of the head of household, and the respondent's age, sex, occupation, education, religion, religiosity, political party and union membership, and left-right political self-placement.
description:
Inglehart, Ronald, et al., 2012, "World Values Surveys and European Values Surveys, 1981-1984, 1990-1993, and 1995-1997"
name:
Inglehart, Ronald, et al.
homePage: http://www.harvard.edu/
name:
Harvard University
ID:
SCR:011273
abbreviation:
DataVerse
homePage: http://thedata.org/
name:
Dataverse Network Project
ID:
SCR:001997