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Title: CAPS Bonus Game 8 (Tragedy of the Commons vs Public Good) (CAPS-BONUS8 and CAPS-BONUS7 module)      
dateReleased:
12-07-2007
downloadURL: http://hdl.handle.net/1902.29/CAPS-BONUS8
ID:
hdl:1902.29/CAPS-BONUS8
description:
This unit ran as BONUS7 in CAPS87 and as BONUS8 in CAPS88. The two administrations are identical. The tragedy of the commons involves a limited product for public use, in the original telling it was the public square for the grazing of livestock. The common could support only a limited number of animals. It was in the best interest of the individual to graze as many of his livestock as possible on the common but if everyone took this tact, then soon the common would be bare of grasses a nd could support no one's livestock. Hence it was in the best interest of all for each to graze a limited few livestock in the common. In this case it is in the best interest of the individual to take and in the interest of the group to leave some for others. The issue of public good is exemplified by listener supported public radio. It is in the best interest of the individual to enjoy public radio without making a contribution but if all listeners chose this option then there would be no funding and public radio would soon go off the air. In this case it is in the individual's best interest to keep and in the interest of the group to give. Both of the above situations are examples of social dilemmas where in the short run, individualis tic optimal choice is in direct conflict with the long term optimal choice for the group. This experiment, in varying forms, was run five other times during the year. In this version each participant was given one of two choices. In the tragedy of the commons condition, they could take $5 for themselves from the team account at an additional transfer charge to the team account of $1. In the public good condition, they could give $5 from their individual account to the team account and CAPS would match their gift with an additional $1. All members of a team were given the same condition but presentation of possible outcomes (you give, they keep -- you give, they give -- you keep, they keep -- you keep, they give) were counterbalanced across individuals. In addition, one half of the participants received an unconditional bonus in the prior week, one half just prior to this experiment. In each week, one half were informed that $24 had been added to either team account, the other half were informed that $5 had been added to their individual account and to the accounts of each of their teammates.
description:
2010, "CAPS Bonus Game 8 (Tragedy of the Commons vs Public Good) (CAPS-BONUS8 and CAPS-BONUS7 module)", http://hdl.handle.net/1902.29/CAPS-BONUS8
homePage: http://www.harvard.edu/
name:
Harvard University
ID:
SCR:011273
abbreviation:
DataVerse
homePage: http://thedata.org/
name:
Dataverse Network Project
ID:
SCR:001997