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Title: Rapid increase in frequency of gene copy-number variants during adaptive evolution in experimental Caenorhabditis elegans populations      
keywords:
Variation
ID:
PRJNA281095
description:
Gene copy-number variation, which provides the raw material for the evolution of novel genes, is surprisingly widespread in natural populations. Experimental evolution studies have demonstrated an extremely high spontaneous rate of origin of gene duplications. When organisms are suboptimally adapted to their environment, gene duplication may compensate for reduced fitness by amplifying promiscuous activity of a gene, or increasing dosage of a suboptimal gene. The overarching goal of this study is to inverstigate whether CNVs constitute a common mechanism of adaptive genetic change during compensatory evolution and to further characterize the role of natural selection in dictating their evolutionary spread at a population-genomic level. Outcrossing populations of C. elegans with low fitness were evolved for >200 generations and the frequencies of CNVs in these populations were analyzed by oligonucleotide array comparative genome hybridization, quantitative PCR, and single-worm PCR. Multiple duplications and deletions were detected in intermediate to high frequencies and several lines of evidence suggest that the changes in frequency were adaptive. 1) Many copy-number changes reached high frequency, were near fixation, or were fixed in a short time. 2) Many independent duplications and deletions in high frequency harbor overlapping regions which likely include genes that are under selection for either higher or lower rates of expression. 3) The size spectrum of deuplications and deletions in the adaptive recovery populations is significantly larger than that of spontaneous copy-number variants in mutation accumulation experiments. This is expected if larger CNVs are more likely to encompass genes that are being selected for altered gene dosage. Out results validate the great potential borne by gene copy-number changes for compensatory evolution and adaptation. Overall design: Experimental genome evolution of copy-number variants in 25 experimental lines compared to 5 ancestral control lines.
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landingpage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA281095
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
name:
Caenorhabditis elegans
ncbiID:
ncbitax:6239
abbreviation:
NCBI
homePage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
ID:
SCR:006472
name:
National Center for Biotechnology Information
homePage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject
ID:
SCR:004801
name:
NCBI BioProject