Mountain View
biomedical and healthCAre Data Discovery Index Ecosystem
help Advanced Search
Title: Validating the Impact of a Molecular Subtype in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) on Progression Free and Overall Survival      
keywords:
Transcriptome or Gene expression
ID:
PRJNA215769
description:
Purpose: The majority of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is diagnosed at advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. A proportion of these patients though will fare well, with a prognosis similar to patients with early stage disease while others die very quickly. Clinicopathological prognostic factors do not allow precise identification of these subgroups. Thus we have validated a molecular subclassification as prognostic factor in EOC. Experimental Design: One hundred ninety-four patients with EOC stage II to IV were characterized by whole-genome expression profiling of tumor tissues and classified using a published 112 gene-set, derived from a FIGO stage directed supervised classification approach. Results: The 194 tumor samples were classified into two subclasses of 95 (subclass 1) and 99 (subclass 2) tumors, grouping all 9 FIGO II tumors in subclass 1 (p=0.001). Subclass 2 (54% of advanced stage tumors) correlated significantly with peritoneal carcinomatosis and non-optimal debulking. Patients with subclass 2 tumors had a worse progression free survival (HR 1.67, p=0.005) by univariate analysis, but it was not an independent factor in multiple analysis. However, overall survival was impaired both, univariate (HR 3.68, p<0.001) and in models corrected for relevant clinicopathologic parameters (HR 3.13, p<0.001). Significance analysis of microarrays revealed 2,115 genes differentially expressed in both subclasses (FDR 5%). Conclusion: In this validation study we showed that in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer two approximately equally large molecular subtypes exist, independent from classical clinocopathological parameters presenting with highly different whole genome expression profiles and an impressively different overall survival. Purpose: The majority of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is diagnosed at advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. A proportion of these patients though will fare well, with a prognosis similar to patients with early stage disease while others die very quickly. Clinicopathological prognostic factors do not allow precise identification of these subgroups. Thus we have validated a molecular subclassification as prognostic factor in EOC. Experimental Design: One hundred ninety-four patients with EOC stage II to IV were characterized by whole-genome expression profiling of tumor tissues and classified using a published 112 gene-set, derived from a FIGO stage directed supervised classification approach. Results: The 194 tumor samples were classified into two subclasses of 95 (subclass 1) and 99 (subclass 2) tumors, grouping all 9 FIGO II tumors in subclass 1 (p=0.001). Subclass 2 (54% of advanced stage tumors) correlated significantly with peritoneal carcinomatosis and non-optimal debulking. Patients with subclass 2 tumors had a worse progression free survival (HR 1.67, p=0.005) by univariate analysis, but it was not an independent factor in multiple analysis. However, overall survival was impaired both, univariate (HR 3.68, p<0.001) and in models corrected for relevant clinicopathologic parameters (HR 3.13, p<0.001). Significance analysis of microarrays revealed 2,115 genes differentially expressed in both subclasses (FDR 5%). Conclusion: In this validation study we showed that in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer two approximately equally large molecular subtypes exist, independent from classical clinocopathological parameters presenting with highly different whole genome expression profiles and an impressively different overall survival. Targeted therapies in second line treatment gain more and more importance in managing recurrent or progressive carcinomas, particularly in ovarian cancer, a cancer entity characterized by a very high recurrence rate. One step ahead, it is necessary to define new therapeutic targets and to select patients who might benefit from these therapies already in first line settings. A robust molecular subclassification could provide both, an adequate patient selection and potential new targets. Notably, the validation of such a subclassification is of outstanding importance to obtain a reliable basis for a specific clinical decision and a rational for the expensive development of new targeted therapies. This work provides a comprehensive basis for both. Overall design: The expression values of 204 epithelial ovarian cancer tissues are determined and used for the validation of a subclassification approach (Cancer Sci. 2009 Aug;100(8):1421-8.)
accesstypes:
download
landingpage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA215769
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
ID:
pmid:22497737
name:
Homo sapiens
ncbiID:
ncbitax:9606
abbreviation:
NCBI
homePage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
ID:
SCR:006472
name:
National Center for Biotechnology Information
homePage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject
ID:
SCR:004801
name:
NCBI BioProject