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Title: Virginia Coast Reserve LTER      
keywords:
metagenome
ID:
PRJNA214728
description:
The Plum Island Sound estuary, located on the Gulf of Maine in northeastern Massachusetts is part of the Plum Island Ecosystems (PIE) Long Term Ecological Research site. The estuary is 25 km long with a mean depth of 2 m at low tide. Tidal range averages 2.6 m, salinity ranges from 0 to 32 psu, and temperature varies seasonally from -1.0 to 28C. The upper half of the estuary is a tidal river flowing through extensive salt marshes, and the lower half is a broad, shallow sound. Three watersheds drain into the estuary: Parker (155 km2), Rowley (26 km2), and Ipswich (404 km2). The Parker River, which flows over a dam and into the head of the estuary, supplies most of the freshwater that is retained in the estuary and exerts the greatest control on salinity distribution and water residence time. Seasonal freshwater discharge in combination with tidal forcing determines the salinity gradient and residence time of water masses, which affect the establishment of planktonic communities in the estuary. Springtime high discharge in the Parker River creates short residence times and displaces the salinity gradient downstream to the lower estuary. During the spring, offshore diatom blooms are tidally driven into the sound and lower portions of the estuary. During summer and fall, periods of low discharge, the majority of the salinity gradient is in the upper and middle portions of the estuary. Summer and fall oligohaline phytoplankton blooms are often prevalent in the upper Parker River when residence times are longer. General research questions for the PIE local MIRADA data sets are: What is the diversity and relative abundance of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya along salinity gradients? What is the diversity and relative abundance of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya during seasonal periods of short and long water residence times? What is the diversity and relative abundance of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya during seasonal changes in phytoplankton blooms? Santa Barbara Coastal LTER The Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) is located on an extremely narrow region of the continental shelf, being only a few kilometers wide in many areas. This allows greater potential for cross shelf processes that affect supply and export of key resources to and from the near shore rocky reef environment. A monthly cross shelf time series program was initiated in January 2008 - April 2009 from the shallow rocky reef environment into the Santa Barbara Channel to examine the onshore to offshore gradients of inorganic and organic nutrients, as well as microbial processes and community structure. The main goals of this study were to (1) to assess the evolution and persistence of temporal and spatial gradients in biogeochemical parameters and how that variability coincided with bacterioplankton dynamics (2) assess the bioavailability of the accumulated DOM via laboratory seawater culture approaches, and (3) investigate the significance of bacterioplankton production, community structure and its associated demand for organic carbon in this near shore environment. These data reveal significant gradients in dissolved organic matter and microbial activity and suggest that at times the near shore rocky reef environment could be highly isolated from offshore waters. If the accumulation of a pool of organic matter resists microbial degradation, then when connectivity between the near shore and offshore does occur a significant flux of energy and associated nutrients could be potentially exported away from this near shore system and remineralized off shore. We hypothesize that the physical and chemical gradients that develop along these horizontal gradients play an important role in structuring the microbial community. In May and September 2008 samples were collected from 5 m depth along the onshore - offshore transect for MIRADA's project for obtaining deep pyrosequencing of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial community. The time points were chosen to represent the period of spring bloom activity and the autumn stratified period. These data combined with the DNA fingerprint data and the biogeochemical variables of nutrients, dissolved and particulate organic matter, primary and bacterial production and biomass will elucidate whether patterns of biogeochemistry will reveal emerging patterns of microbial community structure. Virginia Coast Reserve LTER The Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR) is an extremely dynamic, heterogeneous coastal barrier landscape comprising mainland watersheds, tidal marshes, lagoons, and barrier islands. The goal for the VCR LTER program is to develop a predictive understanding of the response of coastal barrier systems to long-term environmental changes in climate, sea level and land use, and to relate these to the ecological services the coastal barrier systems provide. We focus on how slow progressive environmental changes interact with short-term disturbances such as storms and species invasions to control the dynamics and biotic structure in the coastal barrier landscape. VCR research is organized around three synthetic questions: (A) How do long-term drivers of change (climate, rising sea level, and landuse change) and short-term disturbance events interact to alter ecosystem dynamics and state change, and how is their effect modified by internal processes and feedbacks at the local scale? (B) How do fluxes of organisms and materials across the landscape influence ecosystem dynamics and state change? (C) In the future, what will be the structure of the landscape and what processes will drive ecological state change? All of these synthetic questions are linked to microbial processes. Microbial responses to disturbances are among the most rapid of biological responses to external drivers. Similarly, microbes operating at the scale of microns have substantial effects at the landscape scale and influence both the rate and direction of ecosystem state change. Microbially-mediated processes, such as decomposition, play a critical role in determining how long organic material persists on the landscape and may be the deciding factor on whether marshes will be maintained or lost. The focus of this research has been on integration of microbial activities into the larger landscape, including decomposition, processing of nitrogen in mainland streams, and examination of microbial processes in a complex physical/chemical environment. Typically these activities do not focus on specific organisms, but rather on comparisons between systems and the determination of the scales at which microbes are operating in a coherent fashion. Samples taken for the MIRADA project focus on 4 sites ranging from inland tidal creek (Phillp's creek and Redbank sites) to a more open water micro-tidal estuary (Shoal and Machipongo Inlet) during both summer and winter seasons.
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landingpage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA214728
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
name:
aquatic metagenome
ncbiID:
ncbitax:1169740
abbreviation:
NCBI
homePage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
ID:
SCR:006472
name:
National Center for Biotechnology Information
homePage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject
ID:
SCR:004801
name:
NCBI BioProject