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Title: Paneth cell granule dissolution and bacterial colonization in the intestine of CF mice      
dateReleased:
06-09-2010
description:
Paneth cells of intestinal crypts contribute to host defense by producing antimicrobial peptides that are packaged as granules for secretion into the crypt lumen. Here, we provide evidence using light and electron microscopy that postsecretory Paneth cell granules undergo limited dissolution and accumulate within the intestinal crypts of cystic fibrosis (CF) mice. On the basis of this finding, we evaluated bacterial colonization and expression of two major constituents of Paneth cells, i.e., {alpha}-defensins (cryptdins) and lysozyme, in CF murine intestine. Paneth cell granules accumulated in intestinal crypt lumens in both untreated CF mice with impending intestinal obstruction and in CF mice treated with an osmotic laxative that prevented overt clinical symptoms and mucus accretion. Ultrastructure studies indicated little change in granule morphology within mucus casts, whereas granules in laxative-treated mice appear to undergo limited dissolution. Protein extracts from CF intestine had increased levels of processed cryptdins compared with those from wild-type (WT) littermates. Nonetheless, colonization with aerobic bacteria species was not diminished in the CF intestine and oral challenge with a cryptdin-sensitive enteric pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, resulted in greater colonization of CF compared with WT intestine. Modest downregulation of cryptdin and lysozyme mRNA in CF intestine was shown by microarray analysis, real-time quantitative PCR, and Northern blot analysis. Based on these findings, we conclude that antimicrobial peptide activity in CF mouse intestine is compromised by inadequate dissolution of Paneth cell granules within the crypt lumens. Total RNA was extracted from pooled small intestines of three WT and three CF mice using Tri-Reagent (Molecular Research Center, Cincinnati, OH), and poly(A) RNA was purified by using the MicroPoly(A) mRNA purification kit (Ambion, Austin, TX). The WT and CF poly(A) RNA samples were sent to IncyteGenomics (St. Louis, MO) where they were labeled with cyanine 3 (Cy3) and Cy5, respectively, and hybridized with the UniGEM1.31 array representing 9,570 known genes and expressed sequence tags.
privacy:
not applicable
aggregation:
instance of dataset
ID:
E-GEOD-2958
refinement:
raw
alternateIdentifiers:
2958
dateSubmitted:
07-17-2005
keywords:
functional genomics
dateModified:
03-27-2012
creators:
Lara Gawenis
availability:
available
types:
gene expression
name:
Mus musculus
ID:
A-GEOD-444
name:
Incyte Unigem 1.31
accessURL: https://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/files/E-GEOD-2958/E-GEOD-2958.raw.1.zip
storedIn:
ArrayExpress
qualifier:
gzip compressed
format:
TXT
accessType:
download
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
accessURL: https://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/files/E-GEOD-2958/E-GEOD-2958.processed.1.zip
storedIn:
ArrayExpress
qualifier:
gzip compressed
format:
TXT
accessType:
download
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
accessURL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE2958
storedIn:
Gene Expression Omnibus
qualifier:
not compressed
format:
HTML
accessType:
landing page
primary:
true
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
abbreviation:
EBI
homePage: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/
ID:
SCR:004727
name:
European Bioinformatics Institute
homePage: https://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/
ID:
SCR:002964
name:
ArrayExpress
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