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Title: Youth Development Study, 1988-2004 [St. Paul, Minnesota]      
dateReleased:
04-08-2015
downloadURL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR24881.v2
ID:
doi:10.3886/ICPSR24881.v2
description:
This research was initiated to address the developmental and achievement-related consequences of employment during the adolescent years. The data were collected as part of the ongoing Youth Development Study, which has surveyed the youth nearly annually (exceptions: 1996, 2001, 2006, 2008) since 1988. Whereas developmental psychologists had warned about the dangers of youth employment, when this study was initiated little systemat ic longitudinal data were available to address the benefits and costs of early investment in the labor force. The major guiding hypothesis for the research was that employment in the teen years would have different consequences depending on the pattern of temporal investment in work (duration and intensity) and the quality of work experience. To examine this issue, a panel of 1,139 students was selected randomly from those enrolled in the ninth grade in the St. Paul Public School District during the 1987-1988 academic year. On-site questionnaires were administered in each of the four years of high school, starting in the Spring of 1988. The surveys included detailed questions about students' work and volunteer experiences, as well as experiences in their family, school, and peer group, with an emphasis on the ways that working affected other life domains. Students rated their own intelligence and academic abilities compared to their peers and answered questions about mental health status, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and domestic responsibilities. Shorter surveys containing many of the same topics were administered to students in 1992, 1993, and 1994, and included questions about current family and living arrangements, and employment and volunteer activities. In 1995, a full survey was administered covering the wide range of topics included in the high school surveys as well as information on career plans and life events that had occurred in the past five years. Survey data were also obtained by mail from the parents of the participants during the first and fourth year of the study, when their children were freshmen and seniors. The parents' surveys addressed socioeconomic background as well as attitudes toward teenage employment, their own employment as teenagers, and their experiences in their current employment. Waves 9 through 15 included many of the same questions contained in 1992-1994 surveys. Additionally, these sections focused on the respondents school and work experiences, family relationships such as marital status and children, education level and career preparation, how the respondent learned of his or her job and their level of satisfaction with it, and economic support questions including income level and living expenses. Wave 10 queried respondents on their personal feelings and self-image, environmental behavior and awareness, health issues such as medical conditions and alcohol and/or tobacco use, work related behavior and relationships with coworkers and employers, and rule breaking behavior such as driving under the influence, vandalism, and parking illegally. Wave 11 included additional questions about discrimination and sexual harassment at work, school, and other areas such as housing. They were also asked about the type of discrimination/harassment experienced, and who, if anyone, they notified. Wave 12 topics included employment questions such as hours and days worked, job tasks and responsibilities, and relationships with coworkers. Respondents were also queried about their finances including assets, debt, level of stress from financial obligations, volunteering, relationships such as marriage and divorce, children, the division of household chores, and their relationship with their primary male and female guardian. Respondents were also asked if they had friends to turn to for support and help with making key decisions such as buying a car or changing jobs, life events such as the death of a spouse or romantic partner, being arrested, serious personal injury or illness, and when each of these events occurred. Additional topics included use of alcohol and tobacco, sports participation in high school, political participation, and use of computers and the internet. Demographic variables include student's sex, age, race, education level, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, marital status, employment status, income, language used at home, and whether they were born in the United States. Demographic information was also collected on each parent's sex, race, education level, marital status, religious preference, employment status, income, whether they were born in the United States, as well as the sex and age of all household members during the student's high school years. Please see the ICPSR User Guide for a detailed listing of the contents of this collection, as well as the variables which have been dropped, masked, or recoded due to disclosure risk.
description:
Mortimer, Jeylan T., 2015, "Youth Development Study, 1988-2004 [St. Paul, Minnesota]", http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR24881.v2
name:
Mortimer, Jeylan T.
homePage: http://www.harvard.edu/
name:
Harvard University
ID:
SCR:011273
abbreviation:
DataVerse
homePage: http://thedata.org/
name:
Dataverse Network Project
ID:
SCR:001997