Mountain View
biomedical and healthCAre Data Discovery Index Ecosystem
help Advanced Search
Title: soil metagenome : Pineapple-banana rotation greatly reduced the amount of Fusarium oxysporum through modulating soil microbial communities, especially in the fungal community structure      
keywords:
Other
ID:
PRJDB3102
description:
Continuous cropping with banana results in a population build-up of specific plant pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 4 (FOC) in soil, which causes the Fusarium wilt disease. Crop rotation has been an effective way of controlling different soil-borne diseases. The influence of two crop rotations of pineapple-banana and maize-banana on the population densities of FOC and subsequent soil microbial community structure was investigated in this study to understand the mechanism of how the rotation suppresses the Fusarium wilt disease. The results showed that the pineapple-banana rotated system was more effective than the maize-banana system in the reduction of FOC and the suppression of the Fusarium wilt disease. Then, we investigated the soil bacterial and fungal communities in a field experiment for a crop rotation of two years using deep pyrosequencing of the 16s RNA gene and the ITS region and found a lower relative abundance of FOC in the pineapple-banana rotated treatment than in the maize-banana rotated system. Greater differences in the fungal community membership and structure between the two rotation systems than in bacteria were observed via heat map and Venn analysis, indicating that the fungal community may play a more important role in the alteration of soil function. In the pineapple-banana rotated treatment, the enrichment of Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi phylum, Gp1, Gp2 and Burkholderia genus in bacteria and the significant differences in the main fungal phylum appeared to be the important microbe factors in the FOC decrease. In conclusion, this study characterized bacterial and fungal communities in soils with two different crop rotations and identified bacterial and fungal taxa that may be involved in the suppression of FOC.
accesstypes:
download
landingpage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJDB3102
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
dateReleased:
08-13-2016
name:
soil metagenome
ncbiID:
ncbitax:410658
abbreviation:
NCBI
homePage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
ID:
SCR:006472
name:
National Center for Biotechnology Information
homePage: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject
ID:
SCR:004801
name:
NCBI BioProject

Feedback?

If you are having problems using our tools, or if you would just like to send us some feedback, please post your questions on GitHub.