Mountain View
biomedical and healthCAre Data Discovery Index Ecosystem
help Advanced Search
Title: Gain of the oncostatin M receptor in cervical squamous cell carcinoma is associated with adverse clinical outcome [camb1Mb data]      
dateReleased:
02-16-2011
description:
For many oncogenes, increased expression resulting from copy number gain confers a selective advantage to cells that consequently make up the tumour bulk. To identify oncogenes of potential biological significance in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 36 primary samples and ten cell lines were screened by array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The most commonly occurring regions of copy number gain that also showed amplification were 5p15.2–14.3 (59%), 5p13.3 (65%), and 5p13.2–13.1 (63%). Gene copy numbers were significantly associated with expression levels for three candidate oncogenes at these loci: OSMR (oncostatin M receptor) (p = 0.03), PDZK3 (PDZ domain containing protein 3) (p = 0.04), and TRIO (triple functional domain) (p = 0.03). Further examination by fluorescence in situ hybridization on a tissue microarray of 110 primary cervical SCC samples revealed copy number gain frequencies of 60.9%, 57.3%, and 54.5% for OSMR, PDZK3, and TRIO, respectively, with OSMR adversely influencing overall patient survival independently of tumour stage (p = 0.046). By array CGH, copy number gain of OSMR was not seen in any of 40 microdissected precursor cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs). Moreover, global mRNA expression analysis, using Affymetrix U133A 2.0 Arrays, showed no overexpression of OSMR in SILs, suggesting that OSMR gain and overexpression are relatively late steps in cervical carcinogenesis. In the cervical SCC cell lines CaSki and SW756, exogenous OSM activated downstream-signalling elements of OSMR including STAT3, p44/42 MAPK, and S6 ribosomal protein, and induced transcription of the angiogenic factor VEGF, effects that were reduced by OSMR depletion using RNA interference. We conclude that copy number gain of OSMR is frequently found in cervical SCC and is associated with adverse clinical outcome. As well as being a potential prognostic marker, OSMR is a candidate cell surface therapeutic target aCGH of high grade late stage primary cervical SCCs obtained from the archives of the Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology,
privacy:
not applicable
aggregation:
instance of dataset
ID:
E-GEOD-27332
refinement:
raw
alternateIdentifiers:
27332
keywords:
functional genomics
dateModified:
05-03-2014
availability:
available
types:
gene expression
name:
Homo sapiens
ID:
A-GEOD-13177
name:
University of Cambridge, Dept of Pathology, Centre for Microarray Resources 1 Mb aCGH platform_3584 unique clones
accessURL: https://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/files/E-GEOD-27332/E-GEOD-27332.raw.1.zip
storedIn:
ArrayExpress
qualifier:
gzip compressed
format:
TXT
accessType:
download
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
accessURL: https://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/files/E-GEOD-27332/E-GEOD-27332.processed.1.zip
storedIn:
ArrayExpress
qualifier:
gzip compressed
format:
TXT
accessType:
download
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
accessURL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE27332
storedIn:
Gene Expression Omnibus
qualifier:
not compressed
format:
HTML
accessType:
landing page
primary:
true
authentication:
none
authorization:
none
abbreviation:
EBI
homePage: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/
ID:
SCR:004727
name:
European Bioinformatics Institute
homePage: https://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/
ID:
SCR:002964
name:
ArrayExpress

Feedback?

If you are having problems using our tools, or if you would just like to send us some feedback, please post your questions on GitHub.